Homeless Joe

From Callisto House’s HBBLDC (Homeless Better Business Leadership Development Course), here is an example Pillar Plans document for a homeless man, on SSI, who was accepted into the Callisto House HBBLDC program. He goes by the name of “Homeless Joe” Biden.

He’s having an SSA debit card with the latest stimulus check loaded and Callisto House’s new Debit Card from a new homeless micro-lending banking initiative. He uses the Debit Card to accept deposits, as he is able to save, so it represents his emergency funds account. As well, increases to the credit limit of his micro-lending line of credit extends his overdraft protection.

He found a place to stay at a local Callisto House boarding house. It costs $250 rent/mo, including utilities. The $30 utilities/mo goes to his pre-paid cell phone. The facility houses a Squad, 9 people. It is a converted 2 bedroom apartment, that has a kitchen, a small common area and 9 secured mini-bedrooms. Run by the senior three person team, vote and adopt house policies.



In addition to the Budget Card, Callisto House has released this 5 Year Pillar Plans document. More training & consulting materials to help educate the homeless on business projections and the various financial levers like Income, Debt & Spending, projected over a 5 year period.


This card represents all three common business statements, as well as a credit report and an asset/income listing:

  1. (front) 𝙋𝙧𝙤𝙛𝙞𝙩 & 𝙇𝙤𝙨𝙨 <𝙄𝙣𝙘𝙤𝙢𝙚> 𝙎𝙩𝙖𝙩𝙚𝙢𝙚𝙣𝙩
  2. (front) 𝘽𝙖𝙡𝙖𝙣𝙘𝙚 𝙎𝙝𝙚𝙚𝙩
  3. (back) 𝘾𝙖𝙨𝙝 𝙁𝙡𝙤𝙬 𝙎𝙩𝙖𝙩𝙚𝙢𝙚𝙣𝙩
  4. (back) 𝘾𝙧𝙚𝙙𝙞𝙩 𝙍𝙚𝙥𝙤𝙧𝙩
  5. (back) 𝘼𝙨𝙨𝙚𝙩/𝙄𝙣𝙘𝙤𝙢𝙚 𝙇𝙞𝙨𝙩𝙞𝙣𝙜

With this 5 Year Pillar Plans document, each month & then years can be projected…


The interesting thing about having two arbitrary columns: 1st & 2nd, is that they can be tasked for a variety of uses.

  • 1st: Budget field; 2nd: Actual field.
  • 1st: Actual; 2nd: Percent Changed over last month.
  • 1st: 1st half of the month; 2nd: 2nd half.

Budget of Fifths, by Tenths: You can see this section, in the middle below where the contact info is collected. We divide the income by fifths, or an easier way, into tenths. So take the monthly income of SSI and drop the last number. If the monthly income is $800/mo SSI deposit, then 1 tenth is $80.

We tackle budget expenses in priority order:
1. 1/5th 𝐃𝐞𝐛𝐭𝐬 & 𝐒𝐚𝐯𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐬
2. 2/5ths 𝐑𝐞𝐧𝐭 & 𝐔𝐭𝐢𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐞𝐬
3. 2/5ths 𝐌𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐡𝐥𝐲 𝐒𝐩𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠

Budget of Fifths breakdown:

  • Calculate 1 tenth: ($80/mo)
  • 1 fifth, or 2 tenths is for Debts & Savings ($160/mo)
  • 2 fifths, or 4 tenths, is for Rent & Utilities ($320/mo)
  • 2 fifths, or 4 tenths, is for Monthly Spending ($320/mo).
    - Is 1 tenth/week in Weekly Spending ($80/week)

Amazingly, in a demonstration of remarkable self-control, Homeless Joe is saving a tiny little money each month, from his SSI check. He is managing to budget a deposit into his emergency fund at a rate of $60/month. He lives on $80/week. Once Debts are paid in October, an extra $80 goes into the Emergency Fund, each month.

Here are the notes taken by the 3 person Callisto House Business consulting trainees team, regarding their subject, Homeless Joe:

A homeless man, trying desperately to save a little money each month, off of an SSI deposit of $800/month. He is living on $80/week disposable. He has a reloadable debit card, from the SSA, with the latest stimulus check, and a credit line of $250, through a new microlending banking initiative for the poor, by Callisto House. Once Debts are paid in October, an extra $80 goes into the Emergency Fund, each month.

𝐂𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐨 𝐇𝐨𝐮𝐬𝐞 𝐩𝐫𝐢𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐞𝐬: 𝑊𝑒 𝑚𝑢𝑠𝑡 𝑝𝑟𝑜𝑣𝑖𝑑𝑒 𝑠ℎ𝑒𝑙𝑡𝑒𝑟 + 𝑢𝑡𝑖𝑙𝑖𝑡𝑖𝑒𝑠 𝑓𝑜𝑟 40% 𝑜𝑓 𝑆𝑆𝐼, 𝑜𝑟 $320. 𝑊𝑒 𝑎𝑟𝑒 𝑟𝑒𝑎𝑙𝑙𝑦 𝑑𝑖𝑣𝑖𝑑𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑖𝑛𝑡𝑜 𝑓𝑖𝑓𝑡ℎ𝑠. 2 𝑓𝑖𝑓𝑡ℎ𝑠 𝑓𝑜𝑟 𝑟𝑒𝑛𝑡/𝑢𝑡𝑖𝑙𝑖𝑡𝑖𝑒𝑠, 2 𝑓𝑖𝑓𝑡ℎ𝑠 𝑓𝑜𝑟 𝑑𝑖𝑠𝑝𝑜𝑠𝑎𝑏𝑙𝑒 𝑎𝑛𝑑 1 𝑓𝑖𝑓𝑡ℎ 𝑓𝑜𝑟 𝐷𝑒𝑏𝑡𝑠 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑆𝑎𝑣𝑖𝑛𝑔𝑠.

𝐁𝐮𝐝𝐠𝐞𝐭 𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐠𝐲: 𝑇𝑎𝑘𝑒 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑡𝑜𝑡𝑎𝑙 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑐𝑎𝑙𝑐𝑢𝑙𝑎𝑡𝑒 40% (𝑜𝑓 $800 𝑖𝑠 $320). 𝑇ℎ𝑖𝑠 𝑖𝑠 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐜𝐞𝐥𝐥, 𝐚 𝟒𝟎% 𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐢𝐭 𝐨𝐫 $32𝟎. 𝑇ℎ𝑒 𝑟𝑒𝑚𝑎𝑖𝑛𝑑𝑒𝑟 𝑖𝑠 𝑑𝑖𝑣𝑖𝑑𝑒𝑑 𝑖𝑛𝑡𝑜 𝑡ℎ𝑖𝑟𝑑𝑠, 𝑜f 60% 𝑜𝑓 $800 = $480. 𝐷𝑖𝑣𝑖𝑑𝑒 𝑖𝑛𝑡𝑜 𝑡ℎ𝑖𝑟𝑑𝑠, 𝑤ℎ𝑖𝑐ℎ 𝑖𝑠 20% 𝑒𝑎𝑐ℎ 𝑠𝑙𝑖𝑐𝑒, 𝑜𝑟 $160, 𝑜𝑛𝑒 𝑡ℎ𝑖𝑟𝑑 𝑜𝑓 $480. 𝑊𝑒 ℎ𝑎𝑣𝑒 𝑡ℎ𝑟𝑒𝑒 𝑠𝑙𝑖𝑐𝑒𝑠 𝑜𝑓 $160. 𝑂𝑓 𝑡ℎ𝑟𝑒𝑒 𝑠𝑙𝑖𝑐𝑒𝑠, 𝑒𝑎𝑐ℎ 𝑓𝑜𝑟 $160, 𝑜𝑛𝑒 𝑠𝑙𝑖𝑐𝑒 𝑖𝑠 $𝟏6𝟎 𝐨𝐫 𝟐𝟎% 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐃𝐞𝐛𝐭𝐬 & 𝐒𝐚𝐯𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐬. 𝑇ℎ𝑒 𝑜𝑡ℎ𝑒𝑟 𝑡𝑤𝑜 𝑠𝑙𝑖𝑐𝑒𝑠, 𝑜𝑟 $320, 𝑖𝑠 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑑𝑖𝑠𝑝𝑜𝑠𝑎𝑏𝑙𝑒 𝑏𝑢𝑑𝑔𝑒𝑡 𝑓𝑜𝑟 𝑒𝑎𝑐ℎ 𝑚𝑜𝑛𝑡ℎ. 𝐷𝑖𝑣𝑖𝑑𝑒𝑑 𝑏𝑦 4, $320 /4 = $8𝟎/𝐰𝐞𝐞𝐤 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐩𝐨𝐬𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 (10% 𝑜𝑓 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑡𝑜𝑡𝑎𝑙 𝑖𝑛𝑐𝑜𝑚𝑒 𝑝𝑒𝑟 𝑚𝑜𝑛𝑡ℎ).

2 thoughts on “Homeless Joe”

  1. Hallo, es ist immer toll, andere Menschen bei meiner Suche durch die ganze Welt zu sehen. Ich schätze die Zeit sehr, die es hätte brauchen müssen, um diesen großartigen Artikel zusammenzustellen. Prost Bernadine Morrie Mitchael

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