How to take over your town: the inside story of a local revolution

Here is the story [1] of a local uprising, ignoring traditional party boundaries and infighting, to take over the local political tier of governments, the town and parish councils. How will this local revolution affect control in higher levels of government. It remains to be seen, but this local revolution is seeing a transformation of getting the business done. They are responsive and participatory with the local citizenry. They may well be open to a change in the political economy, sealing the revolution for the future.

This is the sort of local revolution I am talking about in the category “Political Revolutionism”. Transform the local political scene to be efficient and accomplished. Solve the local problems in unique ways that ignore the traditional political party boundaries. The party system is what is creating such a mash-up of getting the business done. Go BIG or go home!

Buckfastleigh is not alone. This kind of local uprising has started to occur all over the country. At the May local elections in England, one of the most noticeable changes was the huge increase in the number of independent councillors elected to local authorities, whose numbers increased nearly threefold. Tangled up in that is the proliferation of organised groups, such as BIG, that reject traditional party labels and seek control of the lowest tier of government – town and parish councils – where creative possibilities have tended to be lost in a sea of protocol and tradition.

The article goes on to write about the town of Frome, who seem to have started this movement. They even published a How-To book [2], Flatpack Democracy: A DIY Guide to Creating Independent Politics
by Peter Macfadyen.

Macfadyen reckons there are between 15 and 20 town and parish councils being run along the lines of the Frome model, “with a non-confrontational way of working and a participatory approach to democracy”.

As with all the independents I meet, they insist that orthodox party divides have no relevance to politics at the most local level.

[1] How to take over your town: the inside story of a local revolution – https://www.theguardian.com/society/2019/jun/12/how-to-take-over-your-town-the-inside-story-of-a-local-revolution?utm_source=pocket-newtab
[2] Flatpack Democracy: A DIY Guide to Creating Independent Politics
by Peter Macfadyen – https://www.flatpackdemocracy.co.uk/thebook/

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *